How to Create a Pique Assiette Mosaic Stepping Stone – Helen’s Way

There are probably lots of ways to do stepping stones. I have my way and it works for me. There are lots of things you can put on stepping stones for your garden, like dishes, stones, marbles, keys, whatever you think will look good in a stepping stone.  This type of mosaic is actually called Pique Assiette, which roughly translates to “stolen dishes”. The beauty of doing a stepping stone is that the same method works for most outside mosaic projects.  Check out more of our garden stepping stones.

Tutorial, Pique Assiette Stepping Stones, summerhouseart.com

I’m not a big fan of really orderly designs, with symmetrical elements or tidy circles of pieces arranged in a regimented way. No, I tend to go for the intuitive and fast method of working.

First of all, although I’ve seen lots of sites that say otherwise, this is not suitable for children. It has sharp shards from dishes, it has caustic cement and requires some strength and lots of common sense. I am cutting myself all the time and keep bandages handy and I’m way past childhood.

Secondly, I’d like to say, if you are going to make these, use the proper precautions with mortar and grout. These are caustic materials, they require that you use dust masks when mixing to avoid breathing in the caustic dust. They require that you use rubber gloves to avoid getting the caustic cement on your skin. That said, read the package, note the cautions. Please don’t go leaving this stuff around children and pets! Please remember to clean up as soon as you are done and make sure not to leave this stuff in bowls to harden into cement that you will never ever get off.

Process, Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

You may wonder why I have a photo of a pail of water? Well, the next precaution is NEVER NEVER rinse off anything with cement on it down a drain. It will set and your drains will be plugged! Ok, so why the pail? That’s where I do all my rinsing of gloves, mixing bowls and implements. I let the cement settle for a day or so and then gently pour off the water into a garden path and scrape the cement that settled into the bottom of the pail into a bag and put it in the garbage. There won’t be much but, hey, better in the bag than in your drain.

An important note about dishes and tile to use. If you use tile that is meant for indoor use or dishes that are porous under the glaze you will have this nasty thing happen.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

The moisture will seep under the glaze and when it’s cold the water will expand and pop the glaze right off the dish or tile. I know, because it’s happened to us. So make sure the dish is really dense and not porous and use tile that is very dense and meant for outside use.

The last important note. Wear goggles when snipping dishes. Broken pieces have a way of flying out and hitting someone. Be careful, for obvious reasons with shards. Don’t wipe away little shards with your bare hands, use a dust brush.

OK enough warnings. On to the fun stuff. As I said, I like the intuitive way of creating stepping stones. But having said that I don’t judge what others may like. Creativity is self-expression after all.

You will need:
A concrete stepping stone
Dishes and/or tile
a work table
a pail of water
rubber gloves
dust mask

old cotton socks

Gray or White Mortar or quick set ( I use it in powder form and add water)
a jar of clean water
a bowl for mixing mortar and grout in ( I use old stainless steel mixing bowls)
a trowel for applying the mortar
something to scrape between the pieces to remove too much mortar, like an old knife.
two-wheeled glass cutter or tile nippers
tile cutter
sanded grout ( it comes in colors, so have fun)

Step 1- Getting ready to start
I buy concrete stepping stones from the local home building supply store. We used to make our own, but honestly, it wasn’t worth the effort. Stones are about $2 or $3 to buy. They come round or square.

Put a concrete stepping stone on a work table so you don’t have to be bent over the whole time while creating it. You’ll thank me later. I like to cover the work table with plastic first to save it for other uses. Also, it’s a good idea to put the cement stepping stone up on a few little blocks of wood to raise it off the table surface. It’ll make it easier to get your fingers under when you finally pick it up to move it.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Step 2- Cut up the dishes and tiles
Please put on your eye protection! I wear glasses anyway so that’s mine but really protective goggles are worth it.

Cut up the dishes into bits and pieces using nippers or two-wheel cutters or tile cutters. For cutting up tile, use the scoring wheel on the tile cutters to score the tile and then break it with the tile cutters. If you don’t know how to use one ask the clerk in the tile store, they’ll usually be happy to demonstrate.
Play around a bit with the arrangement. You could arrange them all before hand on an area approximately the same size as the stepping stone. More about this later.

Since mortar sets in about 20 minutes max, laying out your pieces on another surface will cut down on the time it takes.  Or you could do it my way and just arrange them right on the mortar and wing it.  Keeping in mind that the mortar loses its stickiness and you may have to make a little new mortar to finish sticking down pieces.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Step 3- Mixing the mortar
Put on your Dust mask! Put on your Rubber gloves! Seriously!
Wear your rubber gloves! I like to mix with my hands, encased in rubber gloves of course. Don’t do this bare handed! It’s caustic. see warnings above!

Put the powdered mortar in the mixing bowl. You will have to guestimate here for the amount of mortar. Add water from the clean water in the jar, a tiny bit at a time. Mix up the mortar to a peanut butter consistency.

I like to use stainless steel mixing bowls that I find in thrift shops, they work well, and are reusable.

Get it to a peanut butter or just slightly thinner consistency by adding the water to the mortar ( this applies to grout also) very slowly as it will become too thin very quickly if you add too much.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Spread the mortar over the stone using a toothed trowel.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Lay each piece on the mortar and try not to squish up mortar between the pieces. You’ll need that space to put grout in later. If it happens, and it will, just remove it with a blade like tool. I cut and fit dishes as I need to as I go along.

You’ll have to move fast, mortar sets up on a hot day really fast, you’ll have only about 20 minutes! In fact I wasn’t fast enough on this one and it started to dry out and nothing stuck. So I scraped off the dry mortar and just buttered a bit on, for each section I had left to finish. Ok, it’s cheating a bit, but it did work.

BIG NOTE: watch out that when you put pieces down on the mortar that you don’t leave nasty points sticking up. You’ll know you did, painfully, later when you are smoothing grout over the pieces and snag your fingers on a point. And you wouldn’t want to step on a point later.

Be careful, this stuff is sticky and keep the top of your dish pieces clean and wiped off.  Once mortar sets it’s cement and you won’t be able to remove it from the surfaces of the dishes!

NOTE FOR BIG PROJECTS: When we are doing a big project, or if we want to take our time designing a piece, we work a bit differently.  We glue down each piece with a bit of mortar buttered on to the back of each piece.  We just mix up tiny amounts of mortar at a time in a small bowl and apply it to each piece as we stick it down. When the mortar gets too hard, we just clean out the bowl and mix up another fresh tiny amount. 

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Step 4 -Take a break
Now that you have all the pieces mortared down, take a break and enjoy a cool iced tea. When you can’t move the pieces with your fingers, the mortar has set. We’d actually done the mortaring in the evening after a long day and stopped altogether to go in and watch movies. Of course, we cleaned up all the mortar mess like the bowls and implements first in the bucket of water! Then the next morning I was ready to grout.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Step 5 -Grouting
Put on your dust mask and rubber gloves!! Mix the grout in a bowl adding just a little bit of water from the jar at a time. Again I like to mix with my hands.

Get it to a peanut butter or just slightly thinner consistency.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Let the grout “slake” for a few minutes, no more than 5 and with your gloves on still from mixing it by hand pick up a handful and start “smushing ” it all over the surface.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Be sure to fill in each space between the pieces well. I use sanded grout always.

Step 6, or Why should I save old cotton socks?
I like to use old cotton socks to remove the grout from the surface. Some people like to use old sponges but I’ve found it’s just too easy to remove the grout from between the pieces with sponge. Dry old socks work well and you can turn them inside out and use the inside too. Once you have most of the grout removed from the surface leaving only a bit of hazy layer, let it sit. Break time again! Not too long, just 5 minutes and then back to work! Come back and with a clean sock shine up the pieces.

Process, Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

Step 6, Enjoy!
Enjoy the work you’ve just produced. Sit back and tell yourself what a genius you are! Then after your new wonderful stepping stone has had overnight to set and cure, dig it in to your chosen spot in the garden path. Hope you’ve enjoyed my tutorial.  You can use this method for other outdoor projects like bird baths too.  Check out our Mosaic bird baths too, if you’re interested.

Mosaic Stepping Stone Tutorial, summerhouseart.com

(BTW, if you’d like to make a comment, just click on the title.  It’ll take you to comments….and we do appreciate comments )

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17 comments

  1. So that’s how you do it! Very cool (again).

    Helen, you are being a mum with all your precautioning about this and that, but that’s a GOOD thing . Great instructions btw. Although I see my favourite plate, the white one with the crimson serrated edges, has bit the dust so to speak. Or should I say it’s been transformed, from pedestrian platter to sumptuous stepping stone. Very nice!!!

  2. Thanks for saying all my precautioning is a good thing. I just can’t help it, I am a mum, I worry. As for the plate, that one is an old restaurant plate and required severe measures to break, as in a hammer. But it looks good, don’t you think?

  3. Hi Helen,

    I loved all the details you’ve given and in such a easy, friendly style. I can see a book coming…a good winter project, wouldn’t you say?

    Lia

  4. Thank you Lia, glad you found it easy to follow. I’m hoping I’ll get more comments even questions so I’ll know if I forgot anything. As for winter project, who knows?

  5. Your stepping stones are beautiful!
    You gave great directions!
    I had two friends over to make some stepping stones yesterday.. they are a bit different kind… but the warnings certainly apply.
    Love your work!
    Katie

  6. Katie, thank you for your comment! I’m so glad you found my directions helpful. Hope you had a great time making stepping stones!

  7. thanks for the info.. been going crazy experimenting w/pavers. been doing inside stuff for 10yrs anyway, been trying to make my own? stained glass over morter? can i then grout? i guess so if you buy pavers then grout? bag of 80lbs $4.00 as opposed to one at $2.00? do you really think its worth it if you are doing a lot? thanks

  8. Hi Nancy, glad you got something out of my way of doing stepping stones. I haven’t done much with stained glass at all, yet. I mostly use tile and dishes. As for whether it’s worth it to buy ready made stepping stones, I guess it depends on how many you are making. It’s a lot of hot heavy work just to make the stepping stones and you have to make forms to create them in. I guess I’m more interested in doing the mosaics on them. I watch for sales at the garden and lumber stores and buy them then.

  9. What a great set of instructions – very inspiring – especially as this house was owned by a potter before me and I have a bucketfull of her broken pottery
    So tempted to give it a go as you make it look so easy –
    I do like the blue and pink combination of colours you have used in the example.
    K

  10. Karen, It really is a lot of fun to make these stepping stones. Just be careful with pottery that the pieces are not porous because in a freeze thaw, water will enter under the glaze and bits of glaze will pop off. I had to find that out the hard way.

  11. I am beginning a yard from scratch…. I think I would love to make some of these stepping stones for my garden path!

  12. Dishes like ironstone are good, the restaurant variety. Not sure what you mean by porous under glaze. And I thought all ceramic tiles were indoor/outdoor. I’m probably overthinking this a bit.

  13. Some dishes and tile are porous under the glaze and by that I mean that the ceramic is sort of chalky and loose. Hard to explain. But easier if you look at tile. Tile for inside is often white and chalky looking where tile that is non porous is much tougher, denser and often a greyish color. Best to ask where you buy your tile. As for dishes, Ironstone and dishes that are dense like that work. It very often comes down to experimentation.

  14. im about to embark on the use of the broken crockery, China dishes and I have enjoyed the breaking part. Now comes the tough part. I especially like your placing grout on an original stone. Such a simpler way to produce lasting walking gems.
    Thank you!

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